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December 2020

December 8, 2020

Norwegian Christmas Cookies & Baked Goods (Julekaker)

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julekaker

What holiday season would be complete without an incredible variety of cookies and baked goods. In Norway, these are referred to as julekaker.

In the 18th century, baked goods were not made in the home, but rather in bakeries and large farms that had access to large ovens. The concept of cookies and baked goods relating to Christmas did not exist at this time or before. In fact, little reference has been made to what was served during the holidays, but it would have included speciality goods served for other celebrations and high holidays throughout the year. Later, in the 19th century and after the introduction of the household oven, baking became widespread and Christmas cookies and baked goods started to become defined, especially following the Second World War.

The term syv slag småkaker (seven types of cookies) refers to an old tradition of having seven different kinds of cookies in the tin as the number 7 was thought to bring luck and is an important religious number. There are many ideas as to which cookies fall into the original list, but it is generally thought that sandkaker, fattigmann, goro, berlinerkranser, sirupsnipper, and krumkaker should be on there.

To help you find inspiration for bringing some holiday sweetness into your kitchen, I have compiled a list of all of the julekaker recipes you’ll find on my site. I’ll keep this list updated as more recipes are added. Happy baking!


Berlinerkranser

Norwegian berlinerkranser

Brune Pinner

Brune Pinner (Norwegian Christmas Cookies)

Brunost Pepperkake Cake

Layered Brunost Pepperkake Cake

Fattigmann

Fattigmann (Norwegian Poor Man Cookies)

Glitre Kringle

Glitrekringle (Maj-Lis's Norwegian pastry with raisins and nuts)

Julekaker

Julekake (Norwegian Christmas Bread)

Kling (Lefse) from Eksingedalen

Kling (Lefse) from Eksingedalen

Kling from Rollag

Kling from Uvdal

Norwegian Kling (Lefse) from Uvdalsleiven Tradisjonsbakst

Krumkaker

krumkaker

Knekk-Kaker

Norwegian Knekk-Kaker(Thin Christmas cookies with oats)

Nordlandslefse / Hardangerlefse

Nordlandslefse

Pepperkaker

Spicy Norwegian Pepperkaker

Old Fashioned Pepperkaker

Old Fashioned Pepperkaker (Norwegian Gingerbread)

Serinakaker

Serinakaker (Norwegian Christmas cookies)

Smultringer

Smultringer (Norwegian Doughnuts) Served with an Apple Glaze

Snipp

Snipp - Norwegian 'collar' cookies

Sandnøtter

Sandnøtter

Sirupskake

Sirupsnipper

Sirupsnipper

St. Lucia Buns

Lussekatter (St Lucia Buns)

Rømmebrød

Uvdalsleiven Tradisjonsbakst & Rømmebrød

Nevada Berg

Nevada is a utah native and norwegian by heart. When not crafting culinary delights she enjoys her family time and tending to her animals. You most certainly can find her perusing her property for wild berries.

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  1. Martha says:

    Enjoyed reading the history of baking in the 18th Century, I don’t think we thought to know how baking was done at that time. Love all the variety here and would like to know how to download them as single recipes! Thank You.

    • nevada says:

      Hi Martha, so happy you enjoyed reading more about the history! I’m afraid I do not have a function to download all of them into single recipes. You’ll have to click on each one, then copy and paste into a Word document to print. Maybe one day there will be cookbook with all of these recipes in one place 🙂

  2. Sherri Anderson says:

    Thank you for sharing! Loved learning a little tid- bit about my heritage. My moms side of the family came from Norway. I am excited to try these recipes!!

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